20 Cheap Cities to Live in Italy and Work

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This Article was Reviewed by The Chief Editor, Godfrey

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Reviewed by Soliu.

The cheap cities to live in Italy are Palermo, Catania, Naples, Bari, Bologna, Perugia, etc. You can find affordable housing, dining, and entertainment options in these cities and they have growing job market, especially in sectors like tourism, agriculture, and services.

Italy has a large, bustling metropolis, picturesque seaside towns, and quaint villages in the countryside, all of which are distinctive to Italy. 

On the other hand, dwelling in many of these extremely well-known locations in Italy might be quite pricey. 

For this reason, we started our search for the most affordable places in Italy, where you may live at a cost that is within your budget.

The following list is for you if you are concerned about your financial situation and are considering coming to Italy, settling here while working online, or planning on working in the education or tourism industries. 

Having found 20 wonderful and cheap cities to live in Italy, through this blog post, we have made it possible for you to experience the indulgences of the Italian way of life without breaking the bank. 

Cheap Cities to Live in Italy and Work

Cheap Cities to Live in Italy and Work 

Undoubtedly, the provinces in the south of Italy are home to the least expensive cities. 

While there are still some cities beyond the south with cheaper rates, the truth remains that even some cities considered expensive have some less expensive areas. 

A $1,000 monthly budget may get you by in some cities and still lead a comfortable life. 

If you are one of those, who have asked what area of Italy a person on a tight budget can live in?  Soon, you’ll have the answers these cheap cities to live in Italy 

1. Palermo

Palermo

The typical cost of living is $1074, with about 668K in the population.

Sicily is an island off the southern coast of Italy. Its major city is Palermo. The food, customs, and architecture of Palermo, a lively and ancient city, all speak to its rich cultural past. 

Recent years have seen the city go through an urban renewal phase, with new parks, cultural hubs, and public areas being built everywhere.

Palermo is one of the most affordable places to live in Italy, yet it has much to offer. Palermo has a considerably more economical standard of living than other Italian towns, with reasonably priced accommodation, food, and transit. 

The monthly rental cost of a one-bedroom apartment in the city center is approximately $483, while a supper at a nearby restaurant costs approximately €15–€20.

2. Catania

Catania

$1084 is the average cost of living here, and according to surveys, 668K people live there.

Catania is a city on the Sicilian island, well-known for its stunning architecture, bustling marketplaces, and exciting nightlife. 

Numerous ancient sites may be found in the city, such as the Roman Amphitheatre and the Baroque Cathedral, recognised as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Like Palermo, Catania has a cheap cost of living, which draws those looking for an inexpensive place to reside in Italy. 

Compared to other major Italian cities, the cost of housing and food is lower, and transport is reasonably priced compared to other European cities. 

Moreover, a supper at a nearby restaurant would set you back between $18 and $25 for every meal, while a one-bedroom apartment in the city center may be rented for between $480 and $500 per month.

3. Perugia

Living in Perugia costs about $1,300. It is a city where you can live well on a modest salary in Perugia.

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This little city in Umbria’s center is well-known for its picturesque surroundings, cultural events, and medieval architecture. 

In addition, Perugia has many historic structures and winding lanes that have stayed the same throughout the years, making it one of Italy’s best-preserved medieval cities.

Even so, Perugia is among the most affordable places in Italy to live despite its allure as a historic city. 

With reasonable housing expenses, cheap food prices, and reasonably priced transport, the city offers a much lower cost of living than other large Italian towns.

In the city center, a one-bedroom apartment rents approximately $480–$550 per month, and a meal at a nearby restaurant costs approximately €15–€20.

4. Bari

Bari

With about $1240, you can work and live in this city. It is said to have a population of about 323,000. 

Situated in the southern area of Puglia, Bari is a port city renowned for its rich cultural legacy, stunning beaches, and medieval architecture. 

One of the biggest cities in southern Italy is Bari, which has a lively and diversified immigrant and local population.

In contrast to most Italian cities, Bari has a reasonably cheap cost of living, considering its size, because of its reasonably priced housing, reasonably priced food, and reasonably priced transit alternatives. 

A dinner at a nearby restaurant will set you back about $25 to $35 for every meal, but a one-bedroom apartment in the city center may be rented for between $500 and $950 per month.

5. Lecce

Living expenses in Lecce are estimated to be about $1146, and 95.4K people live there.

Lecce is a small city in Puglia’s southern region that is well-known for its mouthwatering cuisine, lovely baroque architecture, and pleasant weather. 

Because of its numerous historical sites and cultural attractions, Lecce is frequently called the “Florence of the South.”

Nevertheless, despite all of its charms, Lecce is among the most affordable cities in Italy. 

Compared to other large Italian cities, the cost of living in this city is substantially cheaper, with reasonably priced housing, economical food, and reasonably priced transportation.

Finally, lunch at a nearby restaurant can set you back between $15 and $20 for every meal, while a one-bedroom apartment in the city center may be rented for about $615 monthly.

6. Ferrara

The living expenses here are estimated to be $1121, and it has a population of 132 thousand. It is known for its vibrant cultural scene, mouthwatering regional food, and stunning medieval architecture. 

Ferrara is a tiny city in Emilia Romagna’s northern region. Numerous historical sites, such as the Estense Castle, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, may be found in Ferrara.

Ferrara is also among the most affordable cities in Italy to live in despite its abundance of attractions. 

Compared to other large Italian cities, the cost of living in this city is substantially cheaper, with reasonably priced housing, economical food, and reasonably priced transportation. 

A $15–$20 lunch at a nearby restaurant will set you back about $500–$600 monthly for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center.

7. Pisa 

This is a small city in central Tuscany with about $1223 as the living expenses. Pisa is well-known for its magnificent scenery, world-famous leaning tower, and top-notch universities. 

Pisa is a well-liked tourist and student destination with a thriving nightlife and strong cultural scene.

Living in Pisa is among the cheapest options in Italy, even with its widespread appeal. With reasonably priced accommodation, cheap food, and reasonably priced transport, the city’s cost of living is substantially lower than other large Italian towns. 

Lunch at a nearby restaurant costs about $25–$30, whereas a one-bedroom apartment in the city center may be rented for $500–$600 monthly.

8. Parma

Parma

About 196,000 people live in this country; with $1313, you can successfully live there. It is known for its exquisite regional food, stunning architecture, and rich cultural legacy. Parma is a tiny city in Emilia Romagna’s northern region. 

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Numerous historical sites, such as the Ducal Palace, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, can be found in Parma.

Parma is among the most affordable places to live in Italy, yet it has much to offer. With reasonably priced accommodation, cheap food, and reasonably priced transport, the city’s cost of living is substantially lower than other large Italian towns. 

A $15–$25 lunch at a nearby restaurant will set you back about $500–$670 monthly for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center.

9. Cagliari

Cagliari is a city of about 154,000 people, costing about $1309. It is known for its stunning beaches, quaint old centers, and mouthwatering regional food. Cagliari is a small city on the island of Sardinia. 

Due to its exciting nightlife and thriving cultural scene, Cagliari is a well-liked tourist destination.

Even though it’s very well-known, Cagliari is among Italy’s most affordable places to live. With reasonably priced accommodation, cheap food, and reasonably priced transport, the city’s cost of living is substantially lower than other large Italian towns. 

A lunch at a nearby restaurant can set you back between $15 and $20 per meal, yet a one-bedroom apartment in the city center can be rented for $500 to $633 per month.

10. Avellino.

One can make Avellino their home at a monthly cost of $1,000. Priced at a reasonable level, Avellino is situated approximately 50 km away from Naples. On the other hand, it has been the site of a great number of earthquakes in the past. 

Many historic structures have been demolished due to this, and more buildings may be destroyed in the future.

11. Rome

Rome

The compelling fusion of history, culture, and job options can be found in Rome, the Eternal City.

Although flats in Rome might be pricey, neighborhoods with lower costs, such as Pigneto and San Lorenzo, offer fairly priced housing.

Rome has many work opportunities, especially in tourism, fashion, and cinema. It serves as a center for global organizations as well.

Rome’s world-famous sites, fine dining, and Mediterranean environment contribute to its excellent quality of life.

12. Milan 

Milan is the financial and fashion center of Italy. It is a busy city with a lively way of life.

Although housing might be expensive in Milan, there are reasonably priced options in the suburbs of Bicocca and Lambrate.

With its central location for business and fashion, Milan provides job chances in technology, design, and finance.

Milan offers an interesting quality of life due to its vibrant nightlife, cultural activities, and proximity to the Italian Lakes.

13. Florence

Art, history, and timeless beauty abound in Florence, the birthplace of the Renaissance. Living in Florence may be reasonably priced, especially in neighborhoods like Gavinana and Novoli.

The city’s tourism and art sectors provide employment opportunities in the fashion, academic, and museum sectors.

The rich cultural experience of Florence is derived from its world-renowned artwork, ancient buildings, and Tuscan cuisine.

14. The Venice

The floating city of Venice is a singular location with a calm yet energetic way of life.

Because Venice is situated in a unique location, its cost of living can be higher. However, Mestre on the mainland offers more reasonably priced housing.

The hospitality, tourism management, and artistic sectors are all supported by Venice’s tourism economy.

Living in Venice is a fascinating experience because of its canals, old buildings, and rich artistic history.

15. Turin

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Northern Italy’s Turin is renowned for its industrial history and depth of cultural diversity.

With reasonably priced housing alternatives in neighborhoods like Aurora and San Salvario, Turin has an affordable cost of living.

The city offers a variety of professional options due to its expanding research institutions, increasing IT sector, and automobile industry.

The vast squares, royal palaces, and easy access to the Italian Alps all contribute to Turin’s high standard of living.

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16. The Bologna

Bologna, located in the Emilia-Romagna region, is well-known for its medieval charm, universities, and food.

Apartments in neighborhoods like Saragozza and San Donato are reasonably priced, and Bologna offers an inexpensive cost of living.

Universities and research facilities present employment opportunities in both education and research. Bologna’s flourishing food industry further aids employment prospects.

Bologna is a culturally and gastronomically rich city, thanks to its ancient center, the Two Towers, and delicious food.

17. Naples

Nestled on the picturesque Amalfi Coast, Naples is a city of contrasts, renowned for its splendor and difficulties. 

The cost of living in Naples is reasonable, and areas like Vomero and Chiaia have reasonably priced housing alternatives.

The city offers a variety of jobs in the tourism, business, and educational sectors. There is a sizable agriculture sector in the Naples area.

Naples’s distinctive and passionate lifestyle is fueled by its historic landmarks, beach scenery, and delicious cuisine.

18. Verona

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With its romantic charm and Shakespearean ties, Verona is a city where the past and present coexist.

Verona has a comparatively low cost of living, with affordable housing options available in neighborhoods like Borgo Venezia and San Zeno.

The city’s manufacturing, trade, and tourism sectors all offer a variety of employment opportunities.

Living in Verona is a delightful experience because of the city’s picturesque squares, Roman amphitheater, and proximity to Lake Garda.

19. The City of Genoa

Northern Italian seaside city Genoa is well-known for its delectable food and maritime past.

With moderately priced apartments in neighborhoods like Carignano and Albaro, Genoa offers a reasonable cost of living.

The city’s trade, finance, education, maritime, and shipping sectors provide job prospects.

Genoa’s lively and nautical lifestyle is shaped by its ancient port, Old Town, and seafood from the Ligurian coast.

Conclusion

It’s evident that “la dolce vita” is more than just a catchphrase in these varied urban environments in Italy as we’ve set out on this journey across the fascinating Italian cities where you can live and work.

Italy provides a mosaic of options for individuals looking for a dynamic profession and an alluring lifestyle, from the historical grandeur of Rome to the stylish districts of Milan, the cultural treasures of Florence, and the distinct charm of Venice.

Opportunities abound in Bologna, a city of education and gastronomic delights, and Turin, the birthplace of Italian industry. 

Cities with distinct histories, cultures, and opportunities include Verona, which is drenched in romanticism; Palermo, a Mediterranean beauty; and Naples, a city of contrasts.

Maritime powerhouse Genoa completes our list with a lifestyle focused on the sea that blends modernity and tradition.

Italy offers an extraordinary quality of life no matter which city you select because of its diverse cultural legacy, excellent food, and stunning scenery. 

These towns beckon with chances and experiences that promise a remarkable chapter in your life, whether enjoying a Neapolitan pizza by the Bay of Naples or strolling the alleys of Verona where Shakespeare’s characters once strolled.

Italian towns are more than simply locations for employment; they serve as backdrops for a life rich in culture, history, delicious food, and an unwavering love of life. 

We hope that the city you settle in will symbolise the incredible experience of living and working in one of the most fascinating nations on earth. Best of luck!

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About the Chief Editor

Godfrey Ogbo, the Chief Editor and CEO of AtlanticRide, merges his environmental management expertise with extensive business experience, including in real estate. With a master's degree and a knack for engaging writing, he adeptly covers complex growth and business topics. His analytical approach and business insights enrich the blog, making it a go-to source for readers seeking thoughtful and informed content.

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